hshields16's Profile

Display Name: hshields16
Member Since: 10/7/09

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I have read several blogs where people are reporting rashes and illness from contact with the wet
Class A sewage sludge biosolids "Dillo Dirt" in Zilker Park. I would be interested in knowing if others suffered any adverse health effects, skin lesions, infections, etc. Please contact me. Many gardeners and other victims have been sickened by use of or contact with Class A sludge biosolids "fertilizer".
http://www.sludgevictims.com/Class-A-sludge.html

US EPA SAYS: Regrowth of Salmonella sp. in composted biosolids is a concern, although research shows that salmonellae reach a quick peak during regrowth, then die off. Composting is not a sterilization process and a properly composted product maintains an active population of beneficial
microorganisms that compete against the pathogenic members. Under some conditions,
explosive regrowth of pathogenic microorganisms is possible. http://www.epa.gov/owmitnet/mtb/combioman.pdf

Class A (Dillo Dirt) sewage sludge "biosolids" is a good source of drugs, pharmaceuticals, steroids, endocrine disrupters and toxic industrial chemicals. EPA's toxics release inventory and other documents reveal that each year billions of pounds of hazardous pollutants are released into public sewers, where the wastewater treatment process reconcentrates them in the sewage sludge "biosolids".

http://www.sludgevictims.com/toxic_in_sludge.html

EPA and University of Wisconsin research has found that sewage sludge may also contain infectious human and animal prions which are NOT inactivated by sludge treatment processes.
Prions can cause transmissible spongiform encephalopathies such as Alzheimer's, Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease, Mad Cow Disease, Chronic Wasting Disease, Scrapie, etc.
http://www.sludgevictims.com/pathogens/prion.html

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Sewage sludge fertilizer should not be used in dairy pastures, public parks, ballfields, playgrounds, and home flower and vegetable gardens. Peer reviewed scientific research has found that plants, including vegetables and fodder, can take up sludge pollutants. Pathways of risk include runoff to surface waters, bioaerosols from dried sludge dust, children eat dirt (and sludge), family pets can track the sludge into homes on their feet and fur and topdressed sludge on grazing lands is eaten by livestock and returned to the human food chain in their meat and milk.

Helane Shields, Alton, NH 03809 Sludge researcher since 1996 http://www.sludgevictims.com
hshields@worldpath.net


Apartment Therapy Re-Nest | The Dirt on Compost Made from Treated Sewage
10/7/09 03:34 PM