fledgling aesthete's Profile

Display Name: fledgling aesthete
Member Since: 10/15/08

Latest Comments...

If the author finds Anthropologie hardware pricy, then Nanz is going to blow their mind! In most cases you will need an architect or designer to coordinate the order for you, even to get pricing. A firm I worked for priced pocket door hardware, with a set for one door coming around $3,000. (this is just for the visible hardware - not the track) Granted, this is for a door, not a cabinet, but good hardware can be had for 1/10th that price.

In the meantime, don't forget Rocky Mountain Hardware (which has pricing online), or even Restoration Hardware.


Where To Buy Kitchen Cabinet Hardware: 10 Sources for Knobs and Pulls
8/22/12 03:13 AM

Also, if you go with a grille, the intake vent can be hidden above or integrated with the grille.


Apartment Therapy DC | Good Questions: Getting Rid of a Drop Ceiling?
5/21/09 07:09 PM

Have you considered a wooden grille style? You could paint the mechanical space black, place a sound insulating material over the ducts if it is a concern for you, and use a wooden grille as the ceiling surface. Often, a square or circular shape can be cut out, and a recessed fixture can "float" in that opening - for example, a round fixture that would not touch the edge of the square opening, but would remain flush with the ceiling plane.

If you are adept with tools, you might be able to construct it yourself, with materials from a lumber yard or home store.

You might want to consider the color of the wood, or even painting it to work for you and your space. I personally feel that slender wood pieces look most modern, but that is just a personal preference.

Good luck!

Check these links for inspiration:

http://www.woodceilings.com/grille.html
http://www.woodceilings.com/projects.html
http://www.ceilingsplus.com/products/grillz/index.htm
http://www.ceilingsplus.com/projects/index.htm?Grillz


Apartment Therapy DC | Good Questions: Getting Rid of a Drop Ceiling?
5/21/09 07:07 PM

I would like to suggest a Glo Ball pendant or ceiling mounted fixture from Flos. There are various sizes available, and if you are concerned about the pendant hanging too low, go for the ceiling mounted version.

My favorite feature of this fixture is the even glow created by the diffuser - you can use a fairly bright bulb and still have an even, diffuse glow withut a "hot spot." On top of it functioning well, I find it quite beautiful as well.

I have chosen this fixture for two projects I have worked on, and both clients were extremely happy with it.

A dimmer is a nice accessory to consider for the fixture, if you haven't already.

http://lighting.lucepedia.com/search?w=glo ball


Apartment Therapy New York | Good Questions: Light Fixture for the Dining Room?
5/21/09 06:18 PM

If you do anything, PLEASE, at least consult with an architect, more than one if you have the time. The designer will most likely be able to save time and money on the project. Many people balk at the fee, but hiring a design professional often means that the project will be well coordinated, which is one way overall savings can be acheived. You should meet with as many deisgners as time and patience permit, and get proposals from all that interest you.

Some architects may have a relationship with certain contractors (not in a kick-back kind of way) - these relationships often mean that the contrcator and deisgner work together to find an economical way to accomplish certain designs, an understanding of how to accomplish special details, or even just a contractor who does outstanding work.The architect can be your advocate.

Additionally, someone trained in this area often lends a fresh perspective to the project, and brings to the table new ideas that one may not have even considered.

It doesn't hurt to choose someone with an aesthetic you like, and with whom you get along well.

Good luck!


Apartment Therapy San Francisco | Good Questions: First Steps for this Loft Before & After?
12/10/08 03:27 AM

This is way too fussy for my taste. It seems to be indicative of so many readers obsession with STUFF. A throw, with a tray, with a candle and a bowl of fruit at the foot of the bed? Really? I'm more interested in seeing effortless, livable interiors, versus contrived, themey rooms.

The living room wouldn't still be empty (haha) if one third of the stuff came out of each of the other rooms and resided there.


Apartment Therapy Los Angeles | Southwest #34 Mallory's Budget Bold
10/19/08 05:20 AM

beauteous.


Apartment Therapy Chicago | Pairings: Antique Artwork with Modern Furnishings#comments#comments
10/18/08 03:44 AM

But they have pots...and pumpkins.

Yikes, they must be scraping the bottom of the barrel.


Apartment Therapy Los Angeles | Southwest #28 A Farmer's Market Influence
10/16/08 03:21 PM

I prefer Michael Paulus' work, which this seems to be a riff on.

http://michaelpaulus.com/section/59023.html


Apartment Therapy Unplugged | Look! Anatomy of a Lego Man
10/16/08 04:38 AM

How much did you pay for it? Are you trying to make a big return on your investment?

Why not just list it on ebay or craigslist, and see what people are willing to pay?

You could alwasy find one similar, find its price/value, and go off of that.


Apartment Therapy San Francisco | Good Questions: What is My Milo Baughman Chair Worth?#comments
10/15/08 07:15 PM

Too...much...stuff....


Apartment Therapy Los Angeles | Southwest #26 Graham & David's Modern Escape
10/15/08 06:58 PM

As ghastly as some people seem to think this is, I would much rather experience this kind of space than the standard contrived interiors with their ubiquitous Herman Miller chairs, and prints positioned just so. This gives me something interesting to look at, and love it or hate it, it takes courage to create spaces like these. For that, I give her props.


Apartment Therapy Los Angeles | Trendspotting: Nouveau 80's
10/15/08 06:56 PM