kimg924's Profile

Display Name: kimg924
Member Since: 1/25/08

Latest Comments...

Genius. Holy cow.


Make the Most of Kitchen Drawers By Organizing Diagonally Kitchen Organization
5/12/14 11:21 PM

I don't toss and turn either, so if it's just me in the bed, I can slip out and straighten the sheet and duvet, fluff my pillow, and call it done. Two euro-pillows and a bolster for fancy go on the bench at the end of the bed at night, and back on top during the day. Somehow the ritual of making the bed gets me ready for the day like coffee and a shower, and turning it down at night goes along with night cream and ear plugs. I'm so sexy.


One Simple Trick to Making Your Bed Every Day Comment of the Day
5/12/14 11:17 PM

I make custom pillows and slipcovers, and I make a lot of my own clothes. Bias strips are simply not necessary for the welt cord on slipcovers and pillows because 99% of the sewing is straight. The technique for sewing the welting to corners is to clip the seam allowance around the curve.

I think the statement that bias cut welt lasts longer is simply silly. The longevity of your welt (and finished piece) depends on the quality of fabric and the type of cord: cotton welt cord shrinks and loses it's shape, but poly welt cord won't shrink, holds its shape, and always looks neat. Poly welt cord is more $$ and worth it. I won't use anything else for upholstery.

All said, bias strips are in fact great for plaid welting. Plaid welt will never match the face, so bias disguises the mis-match.

Here's an example of a large plaid window seat slip cover I just finished. I deliberately chose to NOT make bias welting because I liked the mismatch contrast with the over-sized gingham: http://static.squarespace.com/static/500dd74dc4aa251574d94b4d/534c9086e4b0c31f4e6782aa/534c908be4b0ee2568e72fa7/1397526692349/IMG_2650.JPG?format=1500w

Bias is also good for welt that will be applied to curves on upholstered furniture. In this case you're not sewing the welting on, but stapling it on. The stretch / flexibility is useful in these cases; however, it's still not completely necessary.

On the other hand, welting for clothing should always be made to correspond to the garment piece. If you're piping curves like a neckline or armscye, you want the piping to have the same amount of stretch as the garment piece to which it will be applied.

Here's a pair of Eruo pillows with welt cut on the straight: http://static.squarespace.com/static/500dd74dc4aa251574d94b4d/t/51a28d15e4b01fcfc7482dd9/1369607447005/photo-2.JPG?format=1500w


DIY Upholstery Project: How Make Your Own Custom Fabric Piping (or Welting) Apartment Therapy Tutorials
4/17/14 12:47 PM

The first item is "Jokari Over the Door Purse Rack" -- it would be more helpful if AT editors were more mindful of the basic details.

http://www.jokari.com/products/so_06518.html


10 Inspiring Back-of-the-Door Storage Solutions
2/12/14 11:26 AM

Kid-free sounds like toll-free, pest-free, weed-free, wrinkle-free... in other words, their arrival is inherently bad.

How about starting with an attitudinal change?

"How to make your home kid-friendly"
"How to host a kid-friendly day / evening / weekend / week"

it's not about protecting your home, it's about making your home welcome.... and that opens up all kinds of possibilities.

And I'm saying this as a childless adult who frets over their arrival because our space isn't engineered for kids.

I usually prep with a list like:
Apple juice (does't stain) and a plastic sippy cup with a lid
Healthier snacks without dyes -- crackers, mozzarella cheese sticks, baby carrots
chalk (if we're outdoors) crayons and coloring book if we're indoors
tupperware (young kids love to play with containers) and plastic cooking utensils

I popped over to Ikea and got a plastic cup / plate / utensil set that I keep on hand. Can't tell you how many friends have been grateful for that because they don't want my stuff to break either!

And if the kid is still in a high chair, no reasonable parent should be offended if you lay a plastic table cloth or sheet down under the highchair for easy clean up.


How To Host Kids in a Child-Free Home
2/6/14 08:15 PM

Smile at strangers. They will usually smile back. Not all of them, but most of them. I'm astounded at how often this surprises me... if I'm in a good mood and smiling at people in stores or at work in the hallway or where-ever, I get a reinforcing boost because they smile back. If I remember to do this when I'm in a less than happy mood, it totally lifts my spirits.


Brighten Someone's Day: 31 Simple, Thoughtful Ideas Real Simple
2/6/14 07:38 PM

I'm lucky to live near an Ikea, and I like to go through the store for design inspiration. They are ingenious with Storage solutions. Multiples and repetition make an impact, like 2 or 3 pendants or shelves or pillows or vases. Use vertical space. Mix materials.

I don't believe the quality of the Stockholm line is worth the price -- I think ikea takes advantage of a captive audience and up-sells buyers who don't want go shop elsewhere for better quality at the same price point. It's a good business strategy.

Anything that you can sit or lie down on is poor quality, but will last you through a young child or college.

That said, there are many items that I do think are a fabulous value, including everyday glassware, expedit shelving, picture frames, some of the dining tables and desks, and small storage, and curtains.


IKEA 2014 Catalog Sneak Peek:
Stylists Ideas Worth Stealing

1/5/14 02:03 AM

Clothes that don't stay put on hangers: I have different types of hangers for different issues, including flocked hangers for wide neck and slippery tops, clips for pants, shaped for jackets, etc. One type of hanger doesn't fit all.

"In between" clothes: I'm lucky to have a large closet, and I hang anything that I can wear again on a separate bar, which is also a visual cue to actually wear it again. As for lounge wear, I have a rule that I wear the same lounge pants and sweatshirt a few times before I toss in the hamper and before getting out a clean set. I either hang them on the bathroom hook or put them on my sleeping pillow, tucked behind the "decor" pillow and out of sight. This tactic only works if you commit to making the bed.

Space: The big obstacle to putting clothes away, other than the discipline to do so, seems to be having the space available, as opposed to struggling to cram things into crowded drawers and racks. So making space, whether it's more shelving, drawers, bars, or culling the stuff you don't wear, is really key.

I cull twice a year, when I pull out or put away hot weather clothes and shoes for the season. I usually have one or two pairs of shoes that I've worn out, whites that are beyond bleaching, or clothes that I've simply worn out of good condition and find that they are passed over because they're too faded/pilled/big or small/dated. I almost never regret culling .... Notable exceptions are a handful of nearly new and classic wool skirts and pants that I gained too much to wear and gave away, only to lose the weight several years later and wish I had kept them. But that's a very small exception.

I stopped buying trendy clothes and committed to classics a few years ago. My wardrobe is actually MORE flexible and smaller because everything mix matches. I feel like I "need" less because I have things that dress up or down with a change of shoes, belt, scarf, or jewelry. That said, I do have a lot of shoes.

Last, but not least, I almost never buy black. I know, everyone says it's always chic and goes with everything. But. It fades, shows lint and hair more than anything else, and it's flat with any other color. Navy blue, on the other hand, is more sophisticated and interesting with everything, IMO. One of everything in Navy is better than 5 of everything in Black.

Discipline is the key to any small space or clutter problem.


One Simple Way to Keep Your Bedroom More Organized This Year
1/5/14 12:55 AM

PS -- I think part of why this works so well is the contrast between the prim queen-ann feet and the wild flokati. I don't think it would be nearly as cool on a parsons bench, for example


Weekend Project: Give An Old Bench New Life
10/1/10 06:55 PM

Wow, love it. I'd like to do this on an accent stool in my living room!


Weekend Project: Give An Old Bench New Life
10/1/10 06:54 PM

Alexisclaire, if you use a full-spectrum spotlight to augment natural light, there are some great ferns and elephant ear plants that will do well in an east-facing window. Also consider a zebra plant or a peace lilily. I don't think there are many large-scale house plants that do well without a lot of light. Most leafy house plants are tropical, I believe, and if you consider what grows on the forest floor, as opposed to up in the canopy, the plants are smaller.


Inspiration: Bringing Bigger Plants Indoors
10/1/10 06:37 PM

P.S. Work by Gaudi, for comparison

http://www.lagprisflyg.nu/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/gaudi_casa_batllo_02.jpg


Takashi Murakami at Versailles
10/1/10 06:28 PM

I was intrigued with the juxtaposition until I saw the statue mocking the bust and soldier. It's childish and I think it lacks the sophisticated imagination and skill required to carve human likeness from stone. It stopped being a modern contrast of oppulence for me at that point.

This criticism aside, I considered it on it's own merit. The work is just a nod to Gaudi -- sorry, but I don't see anything original here. Just spectacle inspired by the original master.


Takashi Murakami at Versailles
10/1/10 06:25 PM

Love the bucket lanterns.... that could be a fun way to handle outdoor lighting.


The Bucket List
10/1/10 06:15 PM

stitch an elastic strap at the top side of the duvet. Sew a snap on the end of the strap. Sew the other snap onto the hem of your fitted sheet. Wrap the strap down around the head of the mattress and snap it in place.

Or get a less slippery duvet.

Or put a bench at the foot of your bed. It will catch the duvet.

I just can't imagine that this is a problem for many people... seems just kind of strange for it to be a big sleep issue. I agree with the suggestion to tuck it in on one side to hold the rest in place.


Design Dilemma: Adjusting to Life Without a Footboard
10/1/10 06:05 PM

No no no no no. Neon was a bad idea in the 1980s and it's still a bad idea.


Neon Accessories
Roundup

9/30/10 04:13 PM

Why not go with an indian bedspread? The wonderful thing about those textiles is that they work so well together. If you're going with the "marakesh look," then layering all kinds of patterns and color is the way to go!


Duvet Cover Suggestions for Earthy Green Bedroom?
Good Questions

9/30/10 02:24 PM

I love rugs on walls and a great place to get extremely affordable small rugs is http://www.ecarpetgallery.com/default.aspx

Great quality gently used rugs. They arrive with a feeling of authentic history and artisanship and I promise you'll love yours!


Rugs on Walls
9/30/10 02:23 PM

wow, just like those old world master paintings. stunning.


Little Flower School: Floral Instruction with Nicolette & Sarah
9/30/10 02:16 PM

I prefer the aesthetic of the teardrop over the cricket. But this is a neat concept, similar to a pop-up-camper, or those camper tops you used to be able to get for a VW van.

http://www.liverpoolcampervans.com/images/extra/Classic%20VW%20Camper%20Van.jpg


Cricket Trailer by Garrett Finney
SwipeLife

9/30/10 02:14 PM