dancedancekj's Profile

Display Name: dancedancekj
Member Since: 9/1/10

Latest Comments...

A couple things I've learned when landscaping
1) Mass for effect and to decrease your overall plant purchasing. Six spirea spread out over an area makes it look cohesive and well thought-out. A spirea, a caryopteris, a coneflower, a black eyed susan, a feather reed grass and a sedum makes it chaotic.
2) Plant easy annuals while perennials fill in. Things like alyssum, bachelor buttons, california poppies, sunflowers, zinnias, and even six packs of cheap colorful ornamentals will give your yard interest, color, and fill in the spots while your perennials and shrubs fill in.
3) I raise a lot of my own plants. The wintersowing method works well for this (http://www.wintersown.org) in that you don't have to spend too much time, attention, or energy in terms of raising the plants from seed - you just plant them out when ready.


Landscaping Newbie: Where Do I Start?
4/15/13 08:53 PM

I think people may be upset because this ain't the sandbox in terms of gardening conversations. I follow both Rochelle and Andrew's lines of thinking, and agree regarding my own garden and landscaping principles.
If you're looking for an introduction to a field, sitting in on a conversation with passionate experts would probably leave you feeling like you were in over your head, no matter the field. I appreciate the knowledge and experience that both of these individuals have had in regards to working with plants and clients' experiences, and the fact they are bringing something fresh to the table instead of "Top 10 Easy-Peasy 18 months flowering period No-Maintenance Shrubs for your Landscape!!!1!1"


Why Grow That, When You Can Grow This? The Gardenist
3/9/13 02:40 AM

I stick with the Paleo/Primal crowd. The amount of research and review of articles is fantastic, and a constant push for understanding the causation and physiology of food is about as close to perfect as you can get. The understanding surrounding the Paleo/Primal approach is also constantly evolving as new research is performed and our understanding broadens (i.e. Robb Wolf's recent change regarding low carb, Mark Sisson's updates to the Primal Blueprint etc.).


Why Do Health Articles So Often Get It Wrong?
1/25/13 01:08 AM

Perlite and rooting hormone does wonders.


Free Plants! Learning to Propagate The Gardenist
9/12/12 06:47 PM

Oooh, I'm excited for those glass containers. I have the snaplock glassware from Costco, but the silicone lids lending themselves to oven-safe recipes open a whole new range of possibilities and convenience...


IKEA 2013 Catalog Preview: Kitchen Trends & Inspiration, According to IKEA
7/20/12 03:21 PM

I thought this was a really cool post, and there are several other videos showing the plating of his desserts. I think the use of the larger plate is simple - it's drawing your attention to nothing but the dessert itself, utilizing the field of white/empty space around it to draw your focus. Much like an art gallery will utilize a large space to highlight a sculpture as a focal point, this tiny piece of perfection and beauty, a tiny burst of color in a field of hard, cold, white porcelain, grabs your attention and holds it.

I think the small amount is also the idea as well. It's not meant to send you into an insulin coma after consumption. You are to taste the ingredients without exhausting your taste buds or satiation. You have to pay attention to what you are eating, and be mindful. f you're still hungry after this, there are some fast food restaurants up the road, I'm sure. Why must people have slabs of chocolate cake, mountains of ice cream and pounds of sugar drizzled with syrups and stuffed with cream in order for it to be considered sufficient?


Think Like a Pastry Chef: How to Create a Stunning Plate Gilt Taste
7/13/12 12:01 AM

Three words: Dandelion green kimchi.
It's fantastic, and you are welcome :)


Ingredient Spotlight: Dandelion Greens
6/25/12 10:48 PM

I'd also like to add Bachelor Buttons (Centaurea cyanus) for their striking, beautiful blue flower and silvery green foliage, as well as California poppies (Eschscholzia californica) for their bright yellow/orange plums and ferny foliage. Both do well in my heavy clay soil, and have persisted despite me not having sown them intentionally for a good couple of years.


5 Favorite Self Seeding Plants The Gardenist
6/7/12 09:47 AM

Yes, I live in Zone 5 and all of these plants are tender annuals for my zone. These are some of my favorites however - I especially love Verbena bonariensis. I'd also suggest Celosia plumera, Purple Homestead Verbena, and Portulaca 'Magic Carpet' for the sunny annuals/perennials.


Last Minute Spring Planting:
10 Favorites for the Procrastinating Gardener

5/29/12 04:02 PM

Why not put up a one-sided reflective window shade film? That way you can enjoy the light from outside, but not the intrusion on your privacy?


DIY Privacy Windows Sweet Peach
5/18/12 01:05 PM

While the post seems well-intentioned and I understand the point the author is trying to get across (a grown-up house should be thoughtful, functional, and should show evidence of excellent care from the homeowner) I don't think the examples they give are the best ones.

"There's a point when Ikea is a great resource...and there's a point in your life when it's time to step it up, invest in yourself and buy a couch you don't put together yourself." I disagree. The author may see the purchase of expensive furniture as a step of growing up, but it's not necessary to contribute to a grown-up house.

"Do I have people — whether that's a maid, a handyman, a house or pet sitter or an upholsterer — I can rely on to help me get things done around the house?" Here's a grown-up tip I've learned - learn how to do 95% of all household repairs yourself, then call the experts. Outsourcing is a massive waste of money, and isn't necessarily a maturity thing (it's an excess of money, one very few people can truly afford)


Do You Live In A Grownup House?
4/27/12 12:28 PM

Subirrigated planters (#7) are the only way to go if you actually want to grow something.
The pallets, glass jars, and the over the door shoe organizers look cute, but they are awful environments. The pallet and organizer will dry out in a moment's notice, and the glass jars will be perfect for creating an anaerobic environment that is less conducive to growing plants and more suitable for stinky sulfuric bacteria. Even the stereotypical terra cotta pots require tedious, copious amounts of watering in the summer to grow anything.
I have converted all my planters to the subirrigated planters and water maybe once a week if it doesn't rain in the middle of summer. Pretty much any plant will do well in them, and I don't have to babysit them whatsoever.


Gardening without a Garden: 10 Ideas for Your Patio or Balcony Renters Solutions
3/8/12 07:52 PM

Where's the cat food for the cat? Groceries/supplies for the resident? As mentioned, cleaning, hygiene, and cooking supplies? How does one really define possessions anyway?


All I Own: Photographs by Sannah Kvist
3/2/12 01:31 PM

Wintersowing is quite possibly one of the best things ever. There's nothing quite like going outside and finding little lime-green leaves dotting your containers - it's magical!


Snow Starter: Sow Your Seeds In The Snow Garden Design Magazine
3/1/12 12:31 PM

Eh. Seems like something I'd see on Pinterest, and not in a good way. I would have preferred more examples of work being displayed and less fussy, but to each their own.


Before & After: Calm, Creative Home Office Makeover The Office Stylist
2/26/12 02:00 AM

I personally think that there is a large segment of the female population of users that utilize Pinterest in a way that makes it fall sorely short of it's potential. Instead of utilizing it as a design board - grouping objects together in a thoughtful and methodicla manner - it simply becomes like another way to conform with the masses, with little regard for individuality or originality (since it seems everyone posts the same ideas and pins over and over and over again)
I don't know if it will ever reach a male (or large enough) audience as successfully as it would like, only because of the large female presence that pigeonholes its use. I am a male and I have to sift through hundreds of pins regarding wedding dresses, hairstyles, baby photos, women's shoes, and twee disgusting looking cupcakes in order to find anything remotely interesting that I could relate to, even from a gender-neutral interest. I'd like to see more genuinely interesting pins with broader appeal to both genders, and a wide variety of tastes, and the presence of more men on Pinterest just to add some interest for everyone.
Lastly, I'd also like to point out that women do the softcore porn collection boards as well. Type in "Hot guys" and ye shall find.


Pinterest's Growing Appeal May Bring More Men
Design News 02.01.12

2/1/12 09:25 PM

Hadn't heard of the oscillating tool before, I might get one. Definitely have the DeWault on my list - thanks for writing this article! It's super helpful.


My Renovation Tools Top 10: Timothy Dahl
Charles & Hudson

1/31/12 11:02 AM

On the other hand, a white/light floor and surfaces means that I can detect the dirtiness before it becomes a big problem.
Just primed over my kitchen with the disgusting, cheap, poorly executed Tuscan-y terra cotta red. I haven't decided what color to go with yet, but I might just keep it white for a while. What an eyesore.


Pristine Perception: Do Certain Kitchen & Bath Colors Feel "Cleaner"?
1/26/12 05:15 PM

Would have been awesome had they planted some nice billowy perennials behind it. Some Calamagrostis acutiflora 'Karl Foerster' would really have softened it up, and would have been far easier to maintain than the rock mulch.


A Cor-Ten Entry Wall
Ro/Lu

1/3/12 10:12 AM

Thank you for thinking about it! However, if my host made awesome mashed potatoes, turkey, a veggie side without wheat (just a simple batch of roasted veggies works well) I promise you I wouldn't be missing anything else :)
Dessert is a bit more tricky, but the ramikin of crustless pie is a very good idea.


How Should I Cook for a Gluten-Free Thanksgiving Guest?
Good Questions

11/18/11 02:13 PM