BarbaradG's Profile

Display Name: BarbaradG
Member Since: 8/20/10

Latest Comments...

I love my white one, but I'd go nuts over that candy apple red one with the clear glass bowl, and I could live with sea glass, too. I just wonder if they have the power of the ones like mine that sits on two arms.


KitchenAid's New Mixer Colors for 2014: Sea Glass, Bordeaux & Lavender International Home + Housewares Show 2014
3/19/14 02:33 PM

We had a Bunn for nearly 20 years! It has copper tubing inside instead of plastic tubing, and hard water deposits just don't stick to it like plastic, which makes most automatic perkers go bad. There is also the pour and drip method of the Chemex non-electric, which I now use. (Hubs has the Mr. Coffee, but I don't like it.) Put the Chemex in the dishwasher every day and you'll never have any kind of buildup of things that make coffee taste bad. Keep the water just barely below the boiling point, and you'll have a great pot of coffee.


Help Me Find a Reliable Programmable Drip Coffee Maker! Good Questions
3/14/14 04:55 PM

Salad in a quart Mason jar, with the swag already chopped or sliced in other containers until I'm ready to prepare one, and a single serving fruit cup for dressing in the top of the jar, under the lid, makes it go places! Toasted almonds, grated parmesan, chopped tomato, a little chopped bacon or some grilled chicken sometimes but not often, huge ripe olives, my homemade Good Season's knockoff (with EVOO) made with my own dehydrated onions, carrots and garlic is my regular lunch most of the week. It travels to Daytona frequently when I need a beach day, too. I cut all meat consumption in half, cut carbs dramatically, now have salad for lunch, and I've lost 25 pounds and dropped my bad cholesterol 130 points! My LDL was 71 at last test a week ago, & made me a believer in salad power! My cardiologist did handsprings practically! He looks at me with awe! Hell yeah, salad is magic!


Salad Swag: 3 Cures for the Common Salad Lunch Tips from The Kitchn
3/11/14 01:17 PM

My way isn't represented. I like mine scrambled, more on the dry side than creamy, and containing lots of butter-sautéed onions and peppers topped with just salt and pepper. I may even try eating them again. I wasn't allowed to have them after my heart attack, but I've cut my LDL (bad) cholesterol from 270 to 71, so I think I should be allowed a couple every so often, don't you?


The Egg Personality Test: What Your Style of Egg Says About You A Strictly Scientific Quiz
3/5/14 11:00 AM

Mine's under a big corner cabinet adjacent to my big wood cutting board and in between it and the sink, so I can quickly wash and dry my knives, then put them "away" rapidly.


10 Places To Hang a Magnetic Knife Rack
3/4/14 10:27 PM

Oh, and it also makes ice cream so, so easily. Wonderful, creamy ice cream without those yucky things that companies now put into their "frozen dairy dessert" junk.


Should I Buy a KitchenAid or a Kenwood Stand Mixer? Good Questions
3/4/14 05:57 PM

My 15 year old KitchenAid is the pride of my kitchen. I have the one that securely clips onto two arms, and that's the one I'd recommend. It's bigger than the one shown above. It is so versatile; it can of course mix things, knead bread dough, and whip cream, but it also grinds my beef and it could make pasta if I had those attachments, or long strings of fresh tasty sausage. As far as I'm concerned, there's just no competition. It makes my bread and bun dough every week, every year. I've never had to repair any part of my mixer, and lucky the child of mine that inherits it, because it will be an heirloom I'm proud to pass on.


Should I Buy a KitchenAid or a Kenwood Stand Mixer? Good Questions
3/4/14 05:55 PM

The newest research says to get aluminum out of our kitchens - including your cookware - to prevent Alzheimer's. That news went out to doctors and nurses just this week. It does not come from alternative medicine websites, chiropractors, or others, but mainstream physicians in practice. My cookware is either cast iron or stainless steel, and it always has been. It always will be. I will hand it down to my children and their children.


Good Question: What Kind of Nonstick Pan Should I Buy?
2/27/14 03:17 PM

I've never heard of Vim. In what country is it sold? I'd try baking soda and vinegar first, let it soak under a damp towel overnight, and scrub with lots of elbow grease.


How Do I Clean This Stubborn Residue From the Bottom of My Oven? Good Questions
2/27/14 02:06 PM

Although I live 70 miles from one, I love to go to one once or twice a year. My most recent purchases were things that I can't imagine doing without:

<I>Fintorp rails and 25 hooks divided among two rails, & 2 large hanging baskets

Vardefull Potato peeler (although it peels any vegetable, even hard ones like squash, and it is the $4.99 one and not the .99 one! Not the wide one, either. Huge difference!)

Lamplig chopping board, which reaches from the front edge of my counter almost to the wall. Thus, it doesn't move when I slice. I won't use plastic cutting boards anymore except for poultry, because I can sterilize it in the dishwasher. The wood board is much kinder to my knives, and I now can sand down any cuts, plus I recoat my board with mineral oil once a week.
I'm thinking about getting a second board, to which I will permanently attach my Atlas pasta maker.


The IKEA Kitchen: RATIONELL Cutlery Tray
2/27/14 01:54 PM

I've never heard of gushers or dunkaroos either! Those of us who don't live in the New York/New England area eat very differently than you who do live there. Things in your recipes are sometimes/often not things that are in our supermarkets. We do not all have Whole Foods markets; actually, only a tiny fraction of those in the USA do. The nearest one is 70 miles away from where I live. We have never seen that green item you call ramps and that you keep putting in recipes. :-) They are only grown on one farm in the US, I've read, and I do believe that all their ramps are sold exclusively in New York. I have lived near large cities in 10 different states over the past 50 years, am an adventurous and experienced cook, and I've never seen those things anywhere. You all seem to eat far more sugar-sweetened things than we elders do. I'm constantly amazed at the number of recipes for sweet treats that show up on food blogs. In our home, I reserved those things for holidays and birthdays - period. I'm an R. N. who has taught nutrition, I taught it to my children, and I will teach the grandchildren that I have access to when they are old enough, and it won't be food that will make them fat, have cardiovascular disease, strokes, or cancer.

Want some useful news? This week's news from research-land that is sent to physicians and nurses every day says get the aluminum out of your kitchen. As I did a fist pump and screamed, "YES!", I could have hugged my cast iron and stainless steel. They evidently have finally found the connection between aluminum and Alzheimer's. It has been suspected for years, but not proven. Here's their quote for preventing the disease:

1. Minimize saturated fats and trans fats.
2. Vegetables, legumes (beans, peas, and lentils), fruits, and whole grains should be the primary staples of the diet.
3. One ounce of nuts or seeds (one small handful) daily provides a healthful source of vitamin E.
4. A reliable source of vitamin B12, such as fortified foods or a supplement providing at least 2.4 μg per day for adults, should be part of the daily diet.
5. Choose multivitamins without iron and copper if you have a proven need for something, and consume supplements only when directed by your physician.
6. Avoid the use of cookware, antacids, baking powder, or other products that contribute dietary aluminum.
7. Engage in aerobic exercise equivalent to 40 minutes of brisk walking 3 times per week.


The words "dietary aluminum" were in bold print in my newsletter. The entire medical community is screaming about over the counter supplements, cleanses, probiotics, and green shakes. Laxatives are killing people all over the country. What they all want you to know is that your body is not toxic! Those things are all grossly unhealthy for you. Read and heed. I thought you all should know these things. The lay public doesn't get much practical news for a long, long time after discoveries are made.


10 Recipes That Defined the 1990s Recipes of the Decade
2/27/14 01:24 PM

It doesn't work with raisins in Boston Brown Bread! I've even tried cutting the raisins in half to lighten them, and they still sink. I've tried soaking them in warm water, and putting them in dry, and coated with flour. I've tried different sized containers, too, and still no luck in making them float throughout.


No More Soggy-Bottomed Muffins! Keep Fruits from Sinking With This Tip Tips from The Kitchn
2/26/14 11:19 PM

I had an electrical outlet put into my pantry and put my large microwave oven in there so it won't take up my precious counter space. I recently hung my strainers on Command wire hooks, and my KitchenAid tools on the same, on the insides of cabinet doors. Most of my utensils hang from two long Ikea rods on 20 + or -, made for that purpose, which frees up my very rare drawer space.


Why Didn't We Think Of That? 18 Genius Kitchen Organizing Tips From Our Readers Reader Intelligence Report
2/26/14 11:15 PM

I put potlikker with its vegetable into a single serve bowl and pretend it's soup. Love it! Sweet potatoes and okra are the best food group that exists. As long as the okra is fried, anyway. Louisiana can keep her gumbos. I'd like to try that tomato chutney but I've never seen any for sale. As another southern cook, I'm with you mostly on everything above, especially Tabasco (I'm head over heels in love with their chipotle type, and the hot and sweet makes a dynamite flavor in Asian sweet chili sauce), but I hold the line at "rice" grits. Rice isn't as nutritious as corn grits, and I'll have mine yellow and coarsely ground, please, and no instant stuff. Better yet, corn meal mush sliced and fried, and served piping hot with each having our own stick of butter. I won't even touch a flour tortilla. Corn is healthier by far and tastes so much better than flour that I'm amazed that people can stand the white pasty things. Tonight, I'm going to mix up some masa, make a few tortillas, fry some nice and crisp, and have them with my tortilla soup which has been simmering all day, chock full of chipotle Tabasco. I'll fix some fried green tomatoes on the side. Lordy, Lordy, now that's southern heaven.


John T. Edge's 5 Essentials for the Southern Kitchen Expert Essentials
1/8/14 04:14 PM

I began married life with an Osterizer blender 48 years ago which came with the mini blend jars, and I have continued using that method all this time. Using a canning jar is safe and economical. Never use a mayonnaise jar or any commercial food jar. I can chop several items in several jars to have them in a convenient size for using throughout the week. There is nothing to be afraid of, and everything to gain. I gave my old blender to a son a few years ago and have continued this method with a newer KitchenAid blender. Use common sense, and you will be just fine. I don't recommend doing anything at high speed in small jars; use the little jars for chopping nuts, onions, veggies for salads.....that sort of thing. No hot liquids. Use a high quality canning jar like the Ball brand, and not a cheap knock-off from China.
Really, it is perfectly safe. I have an immersion blender for the larger, deep pot, and hot things. Start slow, and work your way up to high speed when it is called for.


The Mason Jar Blender Trick: Do You Know About This?
1/6/14 03:06 PM

I have a too-small kitchen, and only 4 drawers, so I bought Ikea's long rods and two of their large coordinating hanging baskets, and 40 hooks that don't come off the rods. I hang all my utensils, and keep items like my recipe cards, hand-held vacuum tool, veggie peeler and other items that can't hang on the baskets. There is more storage underneath for my electric knife and wrap dispenser. You can stack the rods on top of each other a couple of feet apart, or put them under cabinets as I did. I hang everything I possibly can. Gas isn't available here, so I bought a glass top stove for extra counter prep space. I put my magnetic knife rack under an upper corner cabinet, too, so my knives are held horizontally under the cabinet, and gave away the old knife block.


What Are Some Good Tips for Cooking in a Tiny Kitchen? Good Questions
12/30/13 04:01 PM

Oh, and that Dutch oven also is a must for cooking over a camp fire when you have no electricity. There are charts showing how many charcoal briquettes to place under and on top of the pot to achieve a given temperature. Add roasting to that list. You can even bake a cake or cobbler in one, even over a campfire.


So Tired of Pasta! What Recipes Can I Cook With Just Two Burners? Good Questions
12/30/13 03:26 PM

Absolutely get a thrift store crock pot or beg for one for Christmas or your birthday. If you put food in it in the AM, you'll have a healthy meal in the PM. The largest cast iron skillet with a lid you can find will allow you to stir fry anything from meat to fish to veggies, to potatoes. However! I would get a Lodge Dutch oven that has a lid that can be inverted to use as a skillet, and have the big pot for everything else. Two burners and a good crock pot can produce fabulous and healthy meals. A Dutch oven will allow you to stew, bake, fry, or braise and even preserve food by water bath canning. If I could only have one pot, it would be that. This is the one to get, and it will last you and your grandchildren throughout their lifetimes, and then some:
http://www.lodgemfg.com/seasoned-cast-iron/dutch-ovens/double-dutch-oven-L8DD3


So Tired of Pasta! What Recipes Can I Cook With Just Two Burners? Good Questions
12/30/13 03:23 PM

Those on low salt diets can't brine anything, and as an R.N., I discourage brining for health reasons. Even thin pork chops can be tender if you flour them, brown them very lightly on each side in very little oil, then add a few tablespoons of water to the pan, turn the heat down to a simmer, cover your skillet and let them braise for 8 to 10 minutes, or up to 20 minutes if they are quite thick. Then remove the lid, bring up the heat, and crisp the outside. They'll be tender every time. I've cooked them this way for over 50 years, and my grown sons still beg me to cook them for them.


How Do I Cook Perfectly Tender Pork Chops? Good Questions
12/30/13 03:11 PM

Those on low salt diets can't brine anything, and as an R.N., I discourage brining for health reasons. Even thin pork chops can be tender if you flour them, brown them very lightly on each side in very little oil, then add a few tablespoons of water to the pan, turn the heat down to a simmer, cover your skillet and let them braise for 8 to 10 minutes, or up to 20 minutes if they are quite thick. Then remove the lid, bring up the heat, and crisp the outside. They'll be tender every time. I've cooked them this way for over 50 years, and my grown sons still beg me to cook them for them.


How Do I Cook Perfectly Tender Pork Chops? Good Questions
12/30/13 03:11 PM